Postgrad Launchpad on campus- What it’s like to be a PhD student – 30 November 2017

(Postgrad Launchpad) – What it’s like to be a PhD student

  • Thursday 30th November 2017 @ 13:00-14:00

This interactive session will give you more insight into what PhD study is really like. Put your questions to current PhD students during our panel discussion, and find out more about studying at the doctoral level through our Institute for Academic Development session.

Postgrad Launchpad Events:-Basic CMYK

Thinking about further study? You may have just started your Masters but if you are thinking of applying for a PhD now is the time to get started!

Postgrad Launchpad runs events throughout the year to help students find out more about what it is like to study for a PhD, how to find a PhD, applying for PhDs and information around the types of funding available.

For more information about these events and to book: http://www.ed.ac.uk/students/careers/postgrad-launchpad

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Online Workshops – Postgrad Launchpad Part I: Thinking about a PhD? and Part II: What it’s like to be a PhD student – 23rd and 30th November 2016

(Online) Postgrad Launchpad – Part I: Thinking about a PhD?

  • Wednesday 23rd November 2016 @ 13:00 – 14:30

The IAD is holding an online panel discussion for all Taught Masters students who are considering applying for a PhD at the University of Edinburgh. Students will have the opportunity to ask staff questions about the PhD application process at the UnivHeeHaw/Edinburgh Uni/05.02.08ersity of Edinburgh; gain an insight into possible funding routes; and visa requirements. Representatives from Admissions, IAD, and the International Office will be at the event.

(Online) Postgrad Launchpad – Part II: What it’s like to be a PhD student

  • Wednesday 30th November 2016 @ 13:00-14:30

Got questions about doing a PhD? Want to talk to current Doctoral Researchers about doing a PhD?

The PhD Panel will allow you to engage with current Doctoral Researchers from the University of Edinburgh. The event will provide a great opportunity to network with current Doctoral Researchers and to ask any question about what it’s like to do a PhD.

These sessions will take place via blackboard collaborate (virtual classroom). Booking is required in order to receive the workshop link and further information about how to join the session.

 To find out more and to book a place, please click the following link:

http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/institute-academic-development/postgraduate/taught/courses-events/open-workshops

 

Workshops:Postgrad Launchpad – Part I: Thinking about a PhD? And Part II: What it’s like to be a PhD student – 26 October 2016 and 2 November 2016

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(PGT) Postgrad Launchpad – Part I: Thinking about a PhD?

  • Wednesday 26th October 2016 @ 13:00 – 14:30

This information session will bring together expertise from across the University to provide guidance on the scope and purpose of a PhD, as well as researching your PhD options and looking for funding. Current PhD students will also share their experiences of research study.

(PGT) Postgrad Launchpad – Part II: Thinking about a PhD?

  • Wednesday 2nd November 2016 @ 13:00 – 14:30

Following on from Part I: Thinking about a PhD?

This workshop will allow you to explore the nature of PhD study and the skills you will require for success at doctoral level.

To find out more and to book a place, please click the following link:

http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/institute-academic-development/postgraduate/taught/courses-events/open-workshops

 

 

 

Academic career stories at University of Edinburgh

EDINBURGH UNIVERSITYThe Careers Service and the Institute for Academic Development (IAD) have developed a new resource to showcase the academic career journey from PhD student to group leader or head of institute. You’ll find it interesting to view if you’re thinking of doing a PhD with the intention of following an academic career.

The resource is a collection of video case studies from individuals at the University of Edinburgh who are at different stages of the academic career journey and across a range of disciplines. The case studies show the challenges and rewards of an academic career, and the personal qualities and experiences that can be influential in helping individuals to progress an academic career. In addition, the videos demonstrate the type of support provided by PhD supervisors, research group leaders, and other academic colleagues that has helped the individuals progress their academic career.

To view the resource go to:
www.ed.ac.uk/careers/academic-careers-edinburgh

Workshops: Postgrad Launchpad February 2016

EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY

 

If you’re interested in postgraduate study, more information can be found at the events below:

Making the transition to masters study

  • Wednesday 10 February 2016 at 13:00 – 14:30

This workshop will provide insights into what distinguishes masters study and introduce you to the skills you’ll be expected to develop.

Postgraduate research: preparing for the PhD experience

  • Wednesday 10 February 2016 at 14:30 – 16:00

This workshop will allow you to explore the nature of PhD study and the skills you will require for success at doctorate level.

To find out more and to book a place, please follow the following link:

http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/institute-academic-development/postgraduate/taught/courses-events/open-workshops

PGT Newletter – February 2016

The Institute for Academic Development PGT Newsletter (February 2016) is now live. You can download it from  http://edin.ac/16wZUnc

The newsletter provides further information aboutPGT Newsletter_5_Feb_2016

  • All workshops available in February 2016
  • Postgrad Launchpad workshops
  • Innovative Learning Week 2016
  • Events and courses information
  • Resources
  • Masters Blog and Twitter
  • IAD Cancellation Policy

Resources

Applying for a PhD @ Edinburgh – Research Proposals and Supervisors – Frequently Asked Questions

EDINBURGH UNIVERSITYOn the 5th and 10th of November 2014 the IAD hosted on-campus and online panel discussions about applying for a PhD. This gave Taught Masters students the opportunity to ask staff questions about the PhD application process at the University of Edinburgh.

Representatives from Admissions, EUSA, International Office and the Scholarship Office were there to answer questions and give advice to students.

This blog will cover some of the questions raised during these panel sessions

1. Tips on writing a proposal?

When writing your PhD proposal, start working on your draft as early as possible. Research the topic you want to study, this will help you to plan out your ideas as you begin writing the proposal. Ask others to look at your proposal, get their opinion and ask your colleagues for feedback. They are likely to spot gaps, ask questions which potential supervisors may also raise. Be as precise and clear as you can in writing your proposal. The clearer your proposal can be, the easier it will be for a potential supervisor to understand what your want to research and why.

2. How do you choose a supervisor?

When applying for a PhD, you need to first find a research topic of potential interest and then look at choosing a potential supervisor to guide you through the next three years – this is crucial. Your supervisor will be your advisor on both a personal and professional level.  Your supervisor will be there for you to discuss any issues regarding your research and direct you in other areas that may be of benefit to you. Moreover, by the end of the PhD, you will become an expert in your area of research.When choosing a supervisor consider the following points to help you decide:

  • Look at the publications they have written.
  • Talk to other students in the department; try to get a feel for the department/research group or lab you would potentially be working in for the next three years.
  • If you have the opportunity, try to arrange a short meeting with the potential supervisor to discuss your interests and research proposal.  If this cannot be done face-to-face, try to arrange a telephone conversation or email chat.
  • Keep in mind when you are thinking about doing a PhD to find out what is expected of you, why you want to do this PhD? By talking to other PhD students, this will also help you answer questions such as are you ready to do your PhD right now or whether you would prefer to take a gap year first.

Useful Links
http://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/postgraduate/degree-guide/phd-for-me
http://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/postgraduate/degree-guide/phd-supervisors
https://www.vitae.ac.uk/doing-research/doing-a-doctorate
https://www.vitae.ac.uk/doing-research/doing-a-doctorate/starting-a-doctorate/writing-a-research-proposal

 

 

Applying for a PhD @ Edinburgh – References – Frequently Asked Questions

UNIVERSITYOn the 5th and 10th of November 2014 the IAD hosted on-campus and online panel discussions about applying for a PhD. This gave Taught Masters students the opportunity to ask staff questions about the PhD application process at the University of Edinburgh.

Representatives from Admissions, EUSA, International Office and the Scholarship Office were there to answer questions and give advice to students.

This blog will cover some of the discussions surrounding references raised during these panel sessions.

Examples of questions raised included:

  1. If you have known your referee for only 3 months- is that long enough for someone to then provide a written statement about your work?
  2. Can you submit the same recommendation letters used to apply for Masters?
  3. If the potential referee is not used to writing a reference- what to do?

Choosing your referees is a very important task; your references should reflect your skills and abilities. It is advised to try and pick people who can provide an academic reference, with regards to teaching you, reading and marking your work.  If returning to academia after a long break, then providing an up to date reference relevant to your area of interest would be highly recommended.

If you have recently started your master’s studies, you should try to speak with potential referees in advance and build a stronger relation allowing your referees to then provide a strong recommendation.

Below is a link which provides further information regarding PhD application and reference requirements. This also includes guidance for referees whom may be new to writing PHD references.

http://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/postgraduate/applying/references