Workshop – Is My Writing Academic Enough? – 26th May 2017

(PGT) Is My Writing Academic Enough?

  • Friday 26th May 2017 @ 09:30 – 12:30 istock_000006051647xsmall

Does academic writing have to be dull or obscure, or can it be engaging and direct? This workshop explores the standards and expectations associated with academic writing. We will look at relevant linguistic and stylistic choices (active or passive? first or third person? plain English or jargon?) and consider academic conventions in terms of organisation and writing style. This is very much a ‘hands-on’ workshop with plenty of room for discussion.

Pre-Course Work:
Please bring a short piece of (your own) academic writing to this workshop.

To find out more and to book a place, please click on the following link:
http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/institute-academic-development/postgraduate/taught/courses-events/open-workshops

Workshop – Effective Writing: Grammar – 22 May 2017

(PGT) Effective Writing: Grammar

  • Monday 22nd May 2017 @ 09:30-12:3022

This course aims to show how a well-crafted sentence is put together and to give an understanding of the underlying grammatical rules.

No prior knowledge of grammar is required.

We will be dealing with such problems as tense, sentence length, sentence structure, joining sentences and punctuation, with a view to producing clear, unambiguous and readable academic writing.

This course will not cover writing for specific purposes, such as these, dissertations or abstracts.

To find out more and to book a place, please click on the following link:
http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/institute-academic-development/postgraduate/taught/courses-events/open-workshops

Workshop – (PGT) Critical! (Reading, Writing, Thinking)- 4th April 2017

(PGT) Critical! (Reading, Writing, Thinking)

  • Tuesday 4th April 2017 @ 09:30-12:30

‘Critical’ is a word that is frequently used in academic discourse. Students are advised to think, read and write ‘critically’. But what does ‘critical’ actually mean in an academic context? In this workshoistock_000006051647xsmallp we identify qualities that are core to a critical engagement with academic work, and we explore through examples how you can apply critical values to your reading, writing and academic practice.

To find out more and to book a place, please click on the following link:
http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/institute-academic-development/postgraduate/taught/courses-events/open-workshops

Online Workshop – Getting Started with Scientific Writing – 01 February 2017

(PGT – Online) Getting Started with Scientific Writing

  • Wednesday 1st February 2017 @ 19:00-20:0022

If you find writing a challenge, you are not alone. There are a number of difficulties, but many writers find that their biggest problem is simply getting started.

In this online session we will focus on strategies we can use to help us get over that fear of the big blank page.  We will look at freewriting and how this can help us generate text and, also, help us think on paper.

By the end of this one hour interactive online session, you will have a better understanding of what free writing is and how it can help you in your scientific writing and your scientific thinking.

During this session, you will have the opportunity to do some freewriting, so make sure you have some paper and a pen handy.

This session will take place via blackboard collaborate (virtual classroom). Booking is required in order to receive the workshop link and further information about how to join the session.

To find out more and to book a place, please click the following link:

http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/institute-academic-development/postgraduate/taught/courses-events/open-workshops

Online Workshop: Working Effectively Around Your Life – 22 February 2016

(PGT-Online) Working Effectively Around Your Life

  • students22 February 2016 at 12:30 – 13:30 (UK Time)

This course is aimed at part-time and online Post Graduate Taught students.

This course is aimed at part-time, online and other PGT students who have substantial commitments in addition to their academic workload.

A masters course is an intensive and demanding period. You have to fit a lot of challenging work in around your life, your work, your family etc. and try to keep up the momentum going between semesters. This online, interactive workshop aims to give you practical tips and strategies to working effectively for your masters.

Participants are encouraged to ask questions and raise issues they would like to discuss.

Pre-coursework

Participants are asked to think of their biggest challenge when it comes to time management – and be prepared to tackle it!

This session will not cover

  • Subject or discipline-specific advice
  • English Language advice

To find out more and to book a place, please follow the following link:

http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/institute-academic-development/postgraduate/taught/courses-events/open-workshops

To check the time zone – please click the following link:

https://eu1.bbcollab.com/site/external/isoTimeZoneConverter

This session will take place via blackboard collaborate (virtual classroom). Booking is required in order to receive the workshop link and further information about how to join the session.

Workshop: Proof Reading Skills – 1 December 2015

EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY(PGT) Proof Reading 

  • Tuesday 1 December 2015 at 09:30 -12:30

With that last full stop, the writing task is done. Or is it? This workshop looks at the many stages of copy-editing and proof-reading that must be done before the dissertation is submitted or the academic paper published. We look at some myths about writing, identify common errors and offer a range of techniques for spotting them.

To find out more and to book a place, please follow the link below:
http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/institute-academic-development/postgraduate/taught/courses-events/open-workshops

Resources for Dissertations

Most taught masters programmes include a substantive individual dissertation.Research paper

Dissertations are often based upon independent research but can take other forms (such as consultancy or work placement based). The specific requirements and format varies from programme to programme.

If completing a dissertation, it may help to think about potential topics sooner in your programme rather than later. Ensure the necessary skills you need to succeed are developed throughout the programme.

Knowing what’s expected

The dissertation period can be extremely stressful, therefore it is important you develop the necessary level of scholarly practice throughout your programme of study.

Seek and use feedback as much as possible from earlier written assignments, to ensure academic writing, research, information handling and critical thinking skills are at the right level.

Clarify with your dissertation supervisor the standards expected of you, how the dissertation should be presented, and ensure you understand how your supervision relationship will work, and when your supervisor is available to help you.

We will also be offering a number of workshops in May and June related to dissertation writing.  Booking details can be found:http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/institute-academic-development/postgraduate/taught/courses-events/open-workshops

Useful Resources

Dissertations – Part 1

Most taught masters programmes include a substantive individual dissertation.Research paper

Dissertations are often based upon independent research but can take other forms (such as consultancy or work placement based). The specific requirements and format varies from programme to programme.

If completing a dissertation, it may help to think about potential topics sooner in your programme rather than later. Ensure the necessary skills you need to succeed are developed throughout the programme.

Knowing what’s expected

The dissertation period can be extremely stressful, therefore it is important you develop the necessary level of scholarly practice throughout your programme of study.

Seek and use feedback as much as possible from earlier written assignments, to ensure academic writing, research, information handling and critical thinking skills are at the right level.

Clarify with your dissertation supervisor the standards expected of you, how the dissertation should be presented, and ensure you understand how your supervision relationship will work, and when your supervisor is available to help you.

Useful Resources